QUILT INFO

I used a Buttermilk Basin for the spring wool mat.

Sunday, July 4, 2010

NO "Y" SEAM BLOCK

I am working on blocks that the traditional piecing method would have "Y" seams involved in the making. I think most of you know that "Y" seams are set in pieces. They seem to intimidate some quilters. A good while back, I purchased "Stars by Magic" which is a book by Nancy Johnson-Srebro. The pictures I am sharing with you today are not meant to be a tutorial. You will need the book for the exact measurements of your pieces and the diagrams to assist you. The blocks are made from squares and rectangles only. No diamonds and no set in seams.
There are charts to assist with the measurements and how many of each piece are needed for one block. One nice thing is that the author gives this information for several different sizes of one block. In the above photo, I have two rectangles of the required size. One is placed cross-wise on the small end of the other rectangle following the diagram in the book.
I use a thin ruler and a pencil to mark a diagonal line. This is like sewing connector corners that so many patterns use. I have my pieces on a sandpaper board to help keep them from slipping.
I then sew on the line and trim away the excess.
This is repeated for the second section.
You end up with two pieces that look like the above photo.
Following the diagram in the book, I place the right piece over the left (right sides together). Sew with a 1/4" seam.
You end up with a piece like the one above.
I repeat the process only diagonal stitching line is in the opposite direction from the first section.

You end up with pieces as pictured above.
Again, the pieces are seamed together.
Background squares are laid on the bottom of these pieces, right sides together, marked and sewn like connector squares. Excess fabric is trimmed off. I did not get a picture of the process. Just the finished section.
Next the large background rectangles are attached to the sides of the diamond sections. You will need the book for layout on these. I had to delete a couple photos when I got my stitching out of order. I got ahead of myself on the piecing and had to use Mr. Ripper for a little job.

The two sections are placed right sides together. The diagram in the book was a little hard to understand but I finally got the idea. You again draw a diagonal mark and sew on the line like as if you were doing a connector corner. You then trim the excess fabric away. This is a fair size section that you are cutting off to discard. That does not bother me but, if you like to save the parts and use them, look at the next picture.
The parts could be laid together in this manner and stitched. I think you would loose most of the very inner section when all is stitched together. You can be creative with the cut-offs.
Finally, I stitch the four quarter sections together to make a whole. I like to press the final seam open though the instructions show to press in one direction. I think it makes for less bulk in that very center point where eight diamonds come together.
My block finishes at ten inches. There are directions for a 6", 10", 11", 12", 16", 17", and 18". There are 30 different blocks with detailed instructions in the book. Then there are some bonus blocks & quilt recipes.
Here is a second star I made. I have to think more on piecing these blocks than if I used one fabric instead of two in the center.

The blocks made using this method of squares & rectangles uses more fabric than if you were cutting the diamonds, triangles, and squares required for a block made in the traditional way. It does make what would be more of a challenge to piece, fairly easy as long as you keep the diagrams beside you when piecing. Not a beginner project but definitely intermediate.
This is what happens when you drop your ruler on a pile of fabric and then step on it. I ordered a new one earlier today and will have to make do with a different ruler until it arrives.

It is a rainy 4th of July here but our lawn says that is good.

Com back for a visit soon!
Karen

38 comments:

  1. I have that book too. I have made close to a dozen stars so far.

    I look forward to seeing what you do with your stars!

    ReplyDelete
  2. Your star blocks are very pretty. So far I haven't broken any rulers, but have wallowed them out, so that they cut more of a curve instead of straight lines. LOL It is raining here too, but I am sure the fireworks will still go off at dark. Have a great 4th. Winona

    ReplyDelete
  3. Thank you for all the step by step photos. That technique looks great.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Your stars are beautiful, and that is such an interesting technique that I've never seen before. I'll probably just stick to my old template method, but it is so fun to see these creative new ideas for making complex blocks.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Very pretty! And thanks for sharing the technique.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Wow, that's really neat! I'm going to bookmark this post in case I ever get up the nerve to try it. Looks much easier this way. Thanks!

    ReplyDelete
  7. Thanks, that was very informative (and tricky!).

    ReplyDelete
  8. WOW! That is just amazing!

    ReplyDelete
  9. Now that is what I am talking about!!!! AWESOME!!!!

    ReplyDelete
  10. That's really neat and that was fun going through those stages. I look forward to seeing what you are going to do with your stars :)

    ReplyDelete
  11. I'll have to add this book to my want list! I love stars and I'm one of those haters of the Y seams.
    Your blocks is fantastic and would lovely in a square frame too! Oh I see possibilities.

    ReplyDelete
  12. Great stars! I have that book, but I only used it to make a few stars for a swap. I'll have to find it again and think about a quilt! :-) Sorry for your broken ruler. :-/ I'm looking fwd to seeing more of your stars! :-) Happy stitchin'!

    ReplyDelete
  13. That block is lovely but far too complicated for my little pea brain. Bummer about the ruler - I only have one, I'd be in trouble if I did that, lol!

    ReplyDelete
  14. What a wonderful tutorial...and block!

    ReplyDelete
  15. Wow, this block looks really great. I always hand piece any blocks with Y seams as my hand eye coordination is not very good even if I mark the 1/4 inch seam allowance. Will keep this book in mind if I need to make some of these blocks in the future. Really nice to have the measurements for all the different sizes too. Thanks so much for the tip!

    ReplyDelete
  16. Thanks for the pics. I am loving it and may just need that book.
    Shame about the ruler!

    ReplyDelete
  17. Now that is a quick and nice way to make those lovely blocks!! Auch, I bet it hurt when you stepped on the ruler and heard the cracking sound brrrr, you get attached to those rulers hihi!
    Lots of fun making more blocks! Happy sewing, Daniëlle

    ReplyDelete
  18. Hmmmm very interesting. Thank you for showing us how this works :0)

    Crispy

    ReplyDelete
  19. Very cool method of avoiding Y seams. What a pretty block too!!

    ReplyDelete
  20. hmmmm... I see another book purchase in my future! Thanks, Karen... I think. ;-)

    Love this star block! ...Karen

    ReplyDelete
  21. Looks like a great book. Your blocks are beautiful- as always :)
    Hope your new ruler arrives quickly...

    ReplyDelete
  22. Wow! I love those star blocks! Thanks for sharing the steps and the book too. I think I'm going to shop for that. Hope your ruler comes fast. Hard to live without those :-)

    ReplyDelete
  23. That is incredible -
    thanks for the photos steps - interesting!
    happy belated 4th

    ReplyDelete
  24. Very cool technique. The color choices work well, can't wait to see more.

    ReplyDelete
  25. Those starts are really pretty and I think that I will have to look into that book. I've only done set in seams once and didn't like them, so any information on how to make the whole process easier will be a good thing.

    ReplyDelete
  26. Thank you, Karen! I have saved this post under favorites...love it!

    ReplyDelete
  27. Awesome, Karen. I too have bookmarked this post for future reference.

    Do you know that my sidebar with my blog list only updated today and this post is from the 4th? WHat's up with that? I thought that everyone was on an extended vacation.

    ReplyDelete
  28. I am going to have to check out that book - looks like a fun way of making that star that I have always wanted to do, but felt a little wary of.

    ReplyDelete
  29. What a clever way to make the Y seams easier!

    ReplyDelete
  30. I'm amazed, what a fantastic technique. Thanks for sharing it so I can make a note of the book.

    ReplyDelete
  31. I've not seen that method before. Looks like a very good way to keep the accuracy going. Very pretty block!

    ReplyDelete
  32. Love your star and I will have to check out that book!
    Micki

    ReplyDelete
  33. What pretty blocks! I think I need to give this a try! :0)

    ReplyDelete
  34. Your star blocks are fabulous .... what a great way to make these blocks!

    ReplyDelete